‘I Love Female Orgasm:’ Masturbation, orgasms and more

Do women masturbate? How can partners help women have multiple orgasms? How does one have an or­gasm during intercourse? Just where is the mysterious g-spot? These ques­tions and more were addressed this month at the “I Love Female Orgasm” lecture, a truly perfect topic for a month dedicated to love.

“I Love Female Orgasm” is a lec­ture series put on by sex educators Dorian Solot and Marshall Miller. They speak at colleges across the U.S. about serious subjects in a way that is both interactive and fun. Feb. 8, UW Tacoma students of all different backgrounds and genders listened to the speakers delve into topics such as masturbation, intercourse, female anatomy and heteronormativity.

The couple began the lecture by asking the audience about common phrases they have heard about female orgasms. “Some women have them and some can’t” and “Women can’t have them unless they trust the per­son they’re with” said a few of the attendees. Solot explained that the majority of women reporting that they’ve never had an orgasm are often young women, who will likely go on to experience orgasms later in life.

Solot also went on to say that “the rate of male orgasms in a one night stand heterosexual scenario is about 66 percent while the rate for female orgasms is quite low, around 10 per­cent.” Orgasm rates can change be­cause of many different factors, but lack of trust and open communica­tion in a one-night stand scenario can be a factor.

Solot and Miller also discussed the lack of representation in high school sex education surrounding important sexual organs.

“The clitoris, a really important organ for sexual pleasure, is often left out and not even talked about in high school sex ed,” Miller said.

This erasure of a major female sex organ from education courses con­tributes to the general lack of knowl­edge about female pleasure. Both speakers also stressed that women need more time to warm up and that partners should be aware of this, even if they are ready for sex immediately.

“Foreplay is especially important for women … because human females have sex during any part of their re­productive cycle, where other female mammals only have sex when they are in heat,” Solot said.

If you were at the lecture, you may have already used the tips Solot and Miller provided that night. If you weren’t in attendance, then just re­member these key points: explore your anatomy and figure out what feels good, and if you are trying to increase your partner’s pleasure, have open communication and just ask.

“Really taking the time to explore your own pleasure and not trying to rush an orgasm is important,” Solot said.

PHOTO BY MEILING SPROGER

Alex Alderman

Alex is studying sustainable urban development. She loves going to events around Tacoma and telling people about them. Her goal is to use her degree to make cities more sustainable.

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